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Red Flag: Film Review

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There’s a great new movie called Red Flag opening this week, and if you’re lucky enough to live in New York or Los Angeles, you absolutely must hunt it down at the theater nearest you and watch it with your besties. If you’re outside any of those two cities, go ahead and download it so you can see what I’m talking about. I realize that I am encouraging online piracy, but something tells me the makers of this movie would want (and even hope) that you would do the desperate thing and patronize this movie at any cost (even at no cost).

Red Flag is about a struggling filmmaker named Alex Karpovsky who is on a mission to show his latest indie feature. He wants to take his girlfriend on a tour showcasing his film but she sort of dumps him right before. So he goes it alone – which might be okay if he were anyone else.

Since he is Alex Karpovsky, he is a walking bag of neuroses so hilarious in their extremities that you cannot help but cringe and giggle at the same time. Ergo, when he ends up getting stalked by a groupie he hooks up with while on tour, you don’t really feel bad for him. You feel like you want to send him to therapy. And pay for it. He is like a slightly more confident version of Woody Allen. Only without the whole “marrying-his-daughter” thing. He’s selfish, he’s endearing, he’s totally lacking in self-awareness.

So when his best friend from back home named Henry (Onur Tukel) calls him up to say that he wants to help him promote his film, things get only worse. Henry also ends up hooking up with the stalker groupie River (Jennifer Pedriger) and the movie concludes in a hilarious sequence that has to be seen to be believed. It’s so over-the-top that it might as well have been the climax of Borat.

The movie works because of its three leads who are obviously improvising their lines but doing such a wondrous job at playing off each other that you wonder at times if this isn’t a documentary. This is a comedy about romance and art in the classic sense: it shows how utterly absurd both pursuits are at their core. A fall-down funny must see.

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